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Veterans from WWII to Afghanistan: Looking for Marchers and Riders to Participate in Local Memorial Day Parades

An Opportunity for Us to "Thank You" and Remember Troops We Lost

Veterans from all branches of the U.S. Armed Services are welcome to march or ride (Simsbury) on Monday in the Memorial Day parades in Tariffville and Simsbury.
Veterans from all branches of the U.S. Armed Services are welcome to march or ride (Simsbury) on Monday in the Memorial Day parades in Tariffville and Simsbury.
If you are a Veteran who has served in any branch of the U.S. Armed Services, please consider marching or riding on Monday in either the Tariffville or Simsbury Memorial Day Parades (or both!).

Parade-watchers want the opportunity to cheer, clap and say “thank you” for your bravery and service to our country.

If you served but never engaged in combat, we still want to recognize you.

We also want to acknowledge the many thousands of troops who gave their lives for us over the years ... World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and other conflicts.

Valley Collector Car Club will offer rides for Veterans who would prefer not to march in the Simsbury Parade.

To sign up or for more information, call Ray Jennings at (860) 658-1034. No registration necessary to march or ride.

Parade schedules:

Tariffville Parade
– 9:00am – Veterans should meet at 8:30am at the foot of Winthrop Street. Parade ends at Tariffville Cemetery, where there will be a Memorial Service.
 
Simsbury Parade – 1:30am – Veterans who want to ride should meet at 12:45pm at the end of Somerset Street, which intersects Owens Brook Blvd, one block west of the Simsbury Bank. Marchers should meet in the Simsbury Bank parking lot by 12:45pm.

The Simsbury Parade will conclude with a Memorial Service in front of Eno Hall.

A shuttle bus will be available beginning at 11:30am from the parking lot behind First Church to Owens Brook Blvd and return service will run after the parade.

Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s service and was originally called Decoration Day.

While the origins have been traced to many groups and states, Memorial Day was officially proclaimed in 1868 by General John Logan, National Commander of the Grand Army of the Republic. Flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.

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